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TitleAcupuncture In Practice by Anthony Campbell
Tags Traditional Chinese Medicine Yin And Yang Physician Qi
File Size11.7 MB
Total Pages179
Table of Contents
                            Copyright
Acknowledgements
Foreword
Preface
Introduction
Chapter 1 - Ancient or modern?
Chapter 2 - An outline of the traditional system
Chapter 3 - Modern acupuncture
Chapter 4 - Risks of acupuncture
Chapter 5 - Principles of treatment
Chapter 6 - Choosing where to needle
Chapter 7 - The ATA concept in practice
Chapter 8 - Treatment: general introduction
Chapter 9 - The head and neck
Chapter 10 - The shoulder
Chapter 11 - The upper limb
Chapter 12 - The thoracic and lumbar spine
Chapter 13 - The lower limb
Chapter 14 - The abdomen
Chapter 15 - Generalized stimulation
Chapter 16 - Electricity in acupuncture
Chapter 17 - Ear acupuncture (auriculotherapy)
Chapter 18 - Self-treatment with acupuncture
Chapter 19 - Training and accreditation
Chapter 20 - The future of acupuncture in the West
Further reading
Index
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

Butterworth-Heinemann
An imprint of Elsevier Science Limited
Robert Stevenson House
1–3 Baxter’s Place
Leith Walk
Edinburgh EH1 3AF

© Anthony Campbell 2001

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a
retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic,
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‘Obtaining Permissions’.

British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data
Campbell, Anthony, 1933–

Acupuncture in practice: beyond points and meridians
1. Acupuncture
I Title
615.8�92

ISBN 0 7506 5242 X

Composition by Genesis Typesetting, Laser Quay, Rochester, Kent
Printed and bound in Great Britain by Biddles Ltd, Guildford and King’s Lynn

Page 89

Treatment: general introduction 85

Quite a number of patients present with symptoms that are not
obviously musculoskeletal but which can be treated by needling trigger
points. These could be thought of as musculoskeletal symptoms ‘in
disguise’; we shall encounter a number of examples as we go through the
treatment of the various regions.

Types of spinal pain

It will become apparent as we go on that many of the symptoms to be
described are either located in the spine or are referred from the spine to
other parts of the body. The spine is a major focus of attention in
acupuncture and we therefore need to summarize the main features of
spinal pain at the outset; this description will set the stage for much of
what follows.

It is helpful to distinguish three types of ‘mechanical’ spinal pain, as
suggested by J.P. O’Brien (1984). All are likely to be made worse by
movement, which distinguishes mechanical pain from pain due to
inflammation or malignancy or referred to the spine from elsewhere.
These more sinister varieties of pain are also likely to be worse at night
or when the patient is supine. (See Chapter 12 for a summary of danger
signs in back pain.)

Type A

Type A spinal pain is deep, dull, aching, and poorly localized. It may be
felt in the back or may radiate to distant areas. The distribution of pain is
fairly constant but it doesn’t correspond with the known areas of supply
of nerves or nerve roots. This ‘sclerotome pain’, as it has been called, may
radiate to the eye, chest wall, elbow, groin, lower abdomen, or foot, and
not surprisingly it can give rise to diagnostic problems. A great deal of
acupuncture is concerned with the treatment of this kind of pain. All sorts
of explanations have been advanced for type A pain but none is
particularly convincing, and at present we have to say that the origin of
this pain is unknown.

Type B

Type B pain is in a sense the reverse of type A pain. Instead of being
diffuse and ‘deep’, it is felt at the site of trouble and is accurately
localized. It arises from the superficial tissues (skin, fascia, superficial
ligaments, tips of spinous processes, interspinous ligament). It generally
responds well to acupuncture.

Page 90

86 Acupuncture in Practice

Type C

Type C pain is due to pressure on a nerve or nerve root. It takes the form
of sharp ‘electric shock’ pain that shoots down a limb and typically has
a dermatome distribution. There may be paralysis or weakness, loss of
reflexes, paraesthesia or anaesthesia, or autonomic changes. Since this is
due to direct pressure, it is not to be expected that needling trigger points
or other sites would alleviate it, and acupuncture is indeed generally
ineffective in this kind of pain. However, patients may have more than
one kind of pain, so acupuncture may at least alleviate some of the
symptoms if not all.

Reference

O’Brien J.P. (1984) In: A Textbook of Pain (eds Wall P.D. & Melzack R.). Churchill
Livingstone, Edinburgh.

Page 178

Index 177

Royal London Homeopathic Hospital,
3, 146

RSI see repetitive strain injury

sacroiliac region, 118–9, 119, 122
safety, 36–41, 54, 118
sanjiao, 12
satellite trigger points, 72
scars, painful, 131
sciatica, 114
science, 5, 6, 7, 8, 30–1
secondary trigger points, 72
segmental acupuncture, 57, 58, 59,

60, 62, 64
self-treatment, 153–6
serotonin, 27, 28
SG see substantia gelatinosa
Shenmen site, 150, 151
shoulders, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 94
Simons, David, 60, 70, 71, 72, 73,

74, 75, 109, 128
Sivin, Nathan, 20
smoking, 150–1
societies, 159, 160, 167
Society of Medical and Dental

Hypnosis, 167
sole of foot, 126–7, 133
spasm relief, TENS, 143, 144
spinal origin back pain (type A), 85,

116
spine, 85, 113–22
Steindler, A., 60
sternum, 113–14
strong reactors, 50–1, 133, 135
subnucleus reticularis dorsalis, 27
substantia gelatinosa neurons, 26
surface anatomy, 41
sweating, 37

Taoism, 4
tenderness, 61, 62, 68, 69, 71, 74, 79,

101
tennis elbow, 105
TENS see transcutaneous electrical

nerve stimulation
tension, muscles, 73, 74
terminology, ATAs, 64–5
theories, 24–9, 56–65

thickness of needles, 45
thoracic outlet syndrome, 100
thoracic spine, 133–22
Tietze’s syndrome, 114
tinnitus, 97
traditional acupuncture, 5, 6, 7

choosing needling sites, 55–6
literature, 162
modern view, 10, 11, 12
outline, 9–21
qi concept, 10–11, 12, 16, 19
treatments, 19

training, 157–60
transcutaneous electrical nerve

stimulation (TENS), 25, 26,
141–4, 142, 164

Travell, Janet, 60, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74,
75, 109

treatments
abdomen, 128–31, 129
acupressure, 155
auriculotherapy, 148–52, 151
cervical articular column 87, 88,

95–7, 96
face, 89, 97–8, 98
generalized stimulation, 114,

132–7
hand and wrist, 106, 108, 108
head, 90, 95, 98
headache, 92, 93, 119–20, 136–7
lower limb, 117, 119, 121
migraine, 136–7
principles, 43–54
self-treatment, 153–6
shoulder, 88, 90, 91, 92
spine, 114–19
upper limb, 105–12

trigeminal neuralgia, 97, 98, 98
trigger point acupuncture, 57, 58,

59–61
trigger points, 20

see also treatments
acupuncture treatment areas, 64
characteristics, 71
deactivation, 75–8
definition, 59, 71
examining patients, 73–4
marking, 77
relevance, 70–1
versus ATAs, 78–9

Page 179

178 Index

ulcerative colitis, 130
unpaired channels, 15
upper limb, 16, 17, 105–12

van Bussel, R., 57
VAS see visual analogue scale
vertebrae, lumbar, 118
vertigo, 97
Vincent, C. A., 162, 163
viral infections, 36, 43
visual analogue scale (VAS), 67

Wall, P. D., 25
watering eye, 94

waveforms, electrical, 142, 142
Western thinking, 7, 8
whiplash injury, 78
White, A., 141
wind concept, 11, 12, 17–18
wrist, 107, 108, 107
writer’s cramp, 107, 110

xue see points

yin and yang, 3, 5, 6, 7, 10, 10, 11

zang, 12

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