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Table of Contents
                            Cover
Change 1
Table of Contents
Preface
Chapter 1: Military Explosives
	SECTION I – DEMOLITION MATERIALS
		EXPLOSIVE SELECTION
			Table 1-1. Characteristics of U.S. Explosives
		DOMESTIC EXPLOSIVES
		FOREIGN EXPLOSIVES
		EXPEDIENT DEMOLITION CHARGES
	SECTION II – SERVICE DEMOLITION CHARGES
		BLOCK DEMOLITION CHARGE
			Table 1-2. Characteristics of Block Demolition Charges
		TRINITROTOLUENE BLOCK DEMOLITION CHARGE
			Figure 1-1. TNT Block Demolition Charges
		M112 BLOCK DEMOLITION CHARGE
			Figure 1-2. M112 Block Demolition Charge
		M186 ROLL DEMOLITION CHARGE
			Figure 1-3. M186 Roll Demolition Charge
		40-POUND, COMPOSITION H6 CRATERING CHARGE
			Figure 1-4. 40-Pound, Composition H6 Cratering Charge
		M1 MILITARY DYNAMITE
			Figure 1-5. M1 Military Dynamite
		SHAPED DEMOLITION CHARGE
			Figure 1-6. Shaped Demolition Charges
			Table 1-3. Characteristics of Boreholes Made By Shaped Charges
		M1A2 BANGALORE TORPEDO DEMOLITION KIT
			Figure 1-7. M1A2 or M1A3 Bangalore Torpedo
		M1A3 BANGALORE TORPEDO DEMOLITION KIT
		M4 SELECTABLE, LIGHTWEIGHT ATTACK MUNITION
			Figure 1-8. M4 SLAM
			Table 1-4. M4 SLAM Characteristics
			Figure 1-9. Bottom-Attack Mode
			Figure 1-10. Side-Attack Mode
			Figure 1-11. Timed-Demolition Mode
			Figure 1-12. Command-Detonation Mode
		M300 FIGHTING POSITION EXCAVATOR AND M301 FIGHTING POSITION EXCAVATOR RELOAD KIT
			Figure 1-13. M300 FPE Kit
	SECTION III – DEMOLITION ACCESSORIES
		M700 TIME-BLASTING FUSE
			Figure 1-14. M700 Time Fuse
		DETONATING CORD
			Figure 1-15. Detonating Cord
		BLASTING CAPS
			Figure 1-16. Electric Blasting Caps
			Figure 1-17. Nonelectric Blasting Caps
			Figure 1-18. Booster
		NONELECTRIC BLASTING CAPS PRECRIMPED TO MODERNIZED DEMOLITION INITIATOR COMPONENTS
		BLASTING CAP PROTECTORS
		M1A4 PRIMING ADAPTER
		M1A5 PRIMING ADAPTER
			Figure 1-19. M1A4 and M1A5 Priming Adapters
		M8 BLASTING CAP HOLDER
			Figure 1-20. M8 Blasting Cap Holder
		M1 DETONATING CORD CLIP
			Figure 1-21. M1 Detonating Cord Clip
		M1 ADHESIVE PASTE
		PRESSURE-SENSITIVE ADHESIVE TAPE
		WATERPROOF SEALING COMPOUND
		M2 CAP CRIMPER
			Figure 1-22. M2 Cap Crimper
		M51 BLASTING CAP TEST SET
			Figure 1-23. M51 Blasting Cap Test Set
		BLASTING MACHINES
			Figure 1-24. M34 Blasting Machine
			Figure 1-25. CD450-4J Blasting Machine
		FIRING WIRE AND REEL
			Figure 1-26. RL39A Firing Wire Reel
		NONELECTRIC FIRING DEVICES
			Figure 1-27. M60 Fuse Igniter
			Figure 1-28. M81 Fuse Igniter
	SECTION IV – EXPLOSIVES IDENTIFICATION
		PURPOSE
		MATERIALS
			Table 1-5. Demolition Materials
			Table 1-6. U.S. Mines
			Table 1-7. DODIC Index for Demolition Materials
Chapter 2: Initiating Sets, Priming Methods, Firing Systems, and Modernized Demolition Initiators
	SECTION I – INITIATING SETS
		NONELECTRIC INITIATING SETS
			Figure 2-1. Nonelectric Initiating Set
			Figure 2-2. Cutting a Time Fuse
			Figure 2-3. Crimping a Blasting Cap Onto a Fuse
		FUSE INITIATION
			Figure 2-4. Lighting a Time Fuse With a Match
		COMPONENTS ASSEMBLY
			Figure 2-5. Electric Initiating Set
			Figure 2-6. Western Union Pigtail Splice and Tension Knot
			Figure 2-7. Two-Wire Splice
			Figure 2-8. Series Circuit
		ELECTRIC INITIATING SETS
			Figure 2-9. Testing a Firing Wire on a Reel
	SECTION II – PRIMING SYSTEMS
		PRIMING CHARGES
		PRIMING TRINITROTOLUENE DEMOLITION BLOCKS
			Figure 2-10. Nonelectric Priming With an Adapter
			Figure 2-11. Nonelectric Priming Without an Adaptor
			Figure 2-12. Electric Priming With an Adapter
			Figure 2-13. Electric Priming Without an Adapter
			Figure 2-14. Priming TNT With Detonating Cord
		PRIMING M112 (COMPOSITION C4) DEMOLITION BLOCKS
			Figure 2-15. Priming Plastic Explosives With Detonating Cord
			Figure 2-16. Priming Composition C4 With an L-Shaped Charge
		PRIMING M186 DEMOLITION CHARGES
			Figure 2-17. Priming Sheet Explosives
		PRIMING DYNAMITE
			Figure 2-18. Nonelectric and Electric End-Priming of Dynamite
			Figure 2-19. Nonelectric and Electric Side-Priming of Dynamite
			Figure 2-20. Priming Dynamite With Detonating Cord
		PRIMING 40-POUND, COMPOSITION H6 CRATERING CHARGES
			Figure 2-21. Priming Composition H6 and Ammonium Nitrate Cratering Charges
		PRIMING M2A4 AND M3A1 SHAPED CHARGES
			Figure 2-22. Priming Shaped Charges
		PRIMING M1A2 AND M1A3 BANGALORE TORPEDOES
			Figure 2-23. Priming a Bangalore Torpedo With a Blasting Cap
			Figure 2-24. Single Priming a Bangalore Torpedo With a Detonating Cord
	SECTION III – DETONATING CORD FIRING SYSTEMS
		USE DETONATING CORD FIRING SYSTEMS
			Figure 2-25. Single-Primed System (Dual-Initiated, Single-Fired, Single-Primed)
			Figure 2-26. Dual-Primed System (Dual-Initiated, Dual-Fired, Dual-Primed)
			Figure 2-27. Dual-Primed Charge
			Figure 2-28. Dual-Firing System (Using a Bridge as a Possible Target)
		ATTACH THE BLASTING CAP
			Figure 2-29. Attach a Blasting Cap to the Detonating Cord
		CONNECT THE DETONATING CORD
			Figure 2-30. Square-Knot Connections for Detonating Cord
			Figure 2-31. Branchline Connections for Detonating Cord
			Figure 2-32. Line Main With Branchlines
			Figure 2-33. Connecting With a British Junction
			Figure 2-34. Ring Mains
		INITIATE A FIRING SYSTEM
			Figure 2-35. Attaching Blasting Caps to a Line Main
	SECTION IV – MODERNIZED DEMOLITION INITIATORS
		CHARACTERISTICS
		M11 NONELECTRIC BLASTING CAP WITH A 30-FOOT SHOCK TUBE
			Figure 2-36. M11 Blasting Cap Component (Various Vendors)
			Table 2-1. M11 Characteristics
		M12 NONELECTRIC BLASTING CAP WITH A 500-FOOT SHOCK TUBE
			Figure 2-37. M12 Shock Tube Component and Blasting Cap With a Splicing Kit
			Table 2-2. M12 Characteristics
		M21 NONELECTRIC BLASTING CAP WITH A 500-FOOT MINISHOCK TUBE
			Figure 2-38. M21 MDI With a 500-Foot Shock Tube Component With a Splicing Kit
			Table 2-3. M21 Characteristics
		M13 NONELECTRIC BLASTING CAP WITH A 1,000-FOOT SHOCK TUBE
			Figure 2-39. M13 Shock Tube Component and Blasting Cap With a Splicing Kit
			Table 2-4. M13 Characteristics
		M23 NONELECTRIC BLASTING CAP WITH A 1,000-FOOT MINISHOCK TUBE
			Figure 2-40. M23 MDI 1,000-Foot Shock Tube Component
			Table 2-5. M23 Characteristics
		M14 NONELECTRIC BLASTING CAP WITH A DELAY
			Figure 2-41. M14 Time Fuse Component (Various Vendors)
			Table 2-6. M14 Characteristics
		M18 NONELECTRIC BLASTING CAP WITH A DELAY
			Figure 2-42. 20-Minute Burn Time M18 Component
			Table 2-7. M18 Characteristics
		M15 NONELECTRIC BLASTING CAP WITH A DELAY
			Figure 2-43. M15 Delay Blasting Cap
			Table 2-8. M15 Characteristics
		M151 BOOSTER DEMOLITION CHARGE
			Table 2-9. M151 Characteristics
		M152 BOOSTER DEMOLITION CHARGE
			Figure 2-44. M152 Low-Strength Detonating Cord Component
			Table 2-10. M152 Characteristics
		M19 NONELECTRIC BLASTING CAP WITH A DUAL MINISHOCK TUBE
			Figure 2-45. M19 Dual-Minitube and Blasting Cap Component
			Table 2-11. M19 Characteristics
		M9 BLASTING CAP AND SHOCK TUBE HOLDER
			Figure 2-46. M9 Blasting Cap and Shock Tube Holder
			Table 2-12. M9 Characteristics
		M81 TIME-BLASTING FUSE IGNITER WITH SHOCK TUBE CAPABILITY
			Figure 2-47. M81 Fuse Igniter
			Table 2-13. M81 Characteristics
	SECTION V – EXPLOSIVE CHARGES PRIMED WITH MODERNIZED DEMOLITION INITIATORS
		NONELECTRIC PRIMING
		TRINITROTOLUENE BLOCK DEMOLITION CHARGE
			Figure 2-48. Priming a TNT Block With an MDI
		MILITARY DYNAMITE
			Figure 2-49. Priming M1 Dynamite With an MDI
		M112 (COMPOSITION C4) DEMOLITION BLOCK
			Figure 2-50. Priming a Composition C4 Demolition Block With an MDI
		40-POUND CRATERING CHARGE
		M2A4 AND M3A1 SHAPED CHARGES
			Figure 2-51. Priming Shaped Charges With an MDI
		BANGALORE TORPEDO
			Figure 2-52. Priming the Bangalore Torpedo With an MDI
	SECTION VI – INITIATING SETS AND FIRING SYSTEMS
		INITIATING SETS
		INSTANTANEOUS OR COMMAND INITIATION
			Figure 2-53. M81 Fuse Igniter With a Shock Tube
		DELAY INITIATION
			Figure 2-54. M9 Blasting Cap Holder in a Delay Initiation
			Figure 2-55. M81 Fuse Igniter With an M14 Time Fuse Installed
		SPECIAL CONDITIONS
		MODERNIZED DEMOLITION INITIATOR FIRING SYSTEMS
			Figure 2-56. MDI Single-Firing System (Single-Primed and Dual-Initiated)
			Figure 2-57. MDI Dual-Firing System (Dual-Primed and Dual-Initiated)
			Figure 2-58. MDI Branchline Array
			Figure 2-59. Combination (MDI and Detonating Cord) Firing System (Dual)
			Figure 2-60. MDI Detonating Cord Clip
		SHOCK TUBE SPLICING
			Figure 2-61. Splicing a Shock Tube
	SECTION VII – SAFETY PROCEDURES
		MODERNIZED DEMOLITION INITIATOR CONSIDERATIONS
		MODERNIZED DEMOLITION INITIATOR MISFIRES
			Figure 2-62. MDI Misfire Procedures
	SECTION VIII – MODERNIZED DEMOLITION INITIATOR USE WITHIN COMMON DEMOLITION MISSIONS
		FIRING SYSTEMS PLANNING
		STEEL-CUTTING CHARGES
			Figure 2-63. Steel I Beam Cutting Charges
		BRIDGE DEMOLITION CHARGES
			Figure 2-64. Bridge Demolition Charges (MDI-Balanced Firing System)
			Figure 2-65. Bridge Demolition Charges (MDI or Detonating Cord Combination)
		BRIDGE DEMOLITION CHARGES AND CONSTRUCTION SEQUENCE USING SHOCK TUBE COMPONENTS
		TIMBER-CUTTING CHARGES
			Figure 2-66. External Timber Charges Using Dual Initiation
			Figure 2-67. Internal Timber Charges With Dual Initiation
		BREACHING CHARGES
			Figure 2-68. Breaching Using Detonating Cord and Dual Initiation
		MINEFIELD BREACHING CHARGES
Chapter 3: Charge Calculations and Placement
	SECTION I – DEMOLITIONS
		DEMOLITION PRINCIPLES
		CHARGE TYPES
		CHARGE CALCULATION FACTORS
			Table 3-1. Breaching Charge Thickness
			Figure 3-1. Direction of Initiation
		EXPLOSIVE SELECTIONS
		CHARGE CALCULATIONS
	SECTION II – NORMAL CUTTING CHARGES
		TIMBER-CUTTING CHARGES
			Figure 3-2. Timber-Cutting Charge (Internal)
			Figure 3-3. Timber-Cutting Charge (External)
			Figure 3-4. Timber-Cutting Ring Charge
		UNDERWATER CHARGES
			Figure 3-5. Cutting a Timber Pile Underwater
			Figure 3-6. Abatis
			Table 3-2. Timber-Cutting Charge Size
		STEEL-CUTTING CHARGES
			Figure 3-7. Placing Charges on Steel Members
			Table 3-3. Hasty, Steel-Cutting Chart for TNT
			Table 3-4. Hasty, Steel-Cutting Chart for Composition C4
			Figure 3-8. Charge Placement on Chains
			Figure 3-9. Charge Placement on a Steel Cable (3 Inches or Larger)
			Figure 3-10. Charge Placement on Railroad Rails
	SECTION III – SPECIAL CUTTING CHARGES
		PURPOSE
		RIBBON CHARGE
			Figure 3-11. Using a Ribbon Charge
			Figure 3-12. Placing a Ribbon Charge on Structural Steel
		SADDLE CHARGE
			Figure 3-13. Using a Saddle Charge
		DIAMOND CHARGE
			Figure 3-14. Using a Diamond Charge
	SECTION IV – BREACHING CHARGES
		CRITICAL FACTORS
		COMPUTATION
			Table 3-5. Material Factor (K) for Breaching Charges
			Figure 3-15. Tamping Factor (C) for Breaching Charges
		REINFORCED CONCRETE BREACHING
		MATERIALS BREACHING
			Table 3-6. Breaching Charges for Reinforced Concrete
			Table 3-7. Conversion Factors for Material Other Than Reinforced Concrete
		NUMBER AND PLACEMENT OF CHARGES
			Figure 3-16. Charge Placement
		COUNTERFORCE CHARGES
			Figure 3-17. Counterforce Charge
	SECTION V – CRATERING AND DITCHING CHARGES
		FACTORS
		HARD-SURFACED PAVEMENT BREACHING
		HASTY CRATER METHOD
			Figure 3-18. Hasty Crater Charge Placement
		DELIBERATE CRATER METHOD
			Figure 3-19. Deliberate Crater Charge Placement
		RELIEVED-FACE CRATER METHOD
			Figure 3-20. Relieved-Face Crater on Dirt- or Gravel-Surfaced Roads
		MISFIRE PREVENTION
		CRATERS CREATED IN PERMAFROST AND ICE
		CRATERS CREATED FROM CULVERTS
		CRATERS CREATED FROM ANTITANK DITCHES
		DITCHING METHODS
			Figure 3-21. Single-Line Ditching Method
			Table 3-8. Single-Line Ditching Explosives Data
			Figure 3-22. Cross-Section Ditching Method
			Table 3-9. Cross-Section Ditching Explosives Data
	SECTION VI – LAND-CLEARING CHARGES
		STUMP REMOVAL
			Figure 3-23. Stump Blasting
		BOULDER REMOVAL
			Figure 3-24. Boulder Blasting
			Table 3-10. Boulder-Blasting Charges
		DETONATING CORD WICK OR SPRINGING CHARGE
		QUARRYING
	SECTION VII – SPECIAL APPLICATIONS
		SURVIVABILITY POSITIONS
			Figure 3-25. Borehole Layouts
		EQUIPMENT DESTRUCTION
			Table 3-11. Gun-Destruction Charge Sizes
			Figure 3-26. AFV Charge Placement
		UNDERWATER DEMOLITIONS
Chapter 4: Bridge Demolition
	BRIDGE DEBRIS
		Figure 4-1. Debris Use
	BRIDGE CATEGORIES
		Figure 4-2. Simply Supported Bridges
	ATTACK TYPES
		Figure 4-3. Three-Pin Arch Effect
		Figure 4-4. Cranked-Beam Effect
	SUCCESSFUL BRIDGE DEMOLITIONS
		Figure 4-5. Improper Collapse Mechanism and Hinges
		Figure 4-6. Jammed Bridge Span
		Figure 4-7. Seesaw Collapse Mechanism
		Figure 4-8. Beam Collapse Mechanism
		Figure 4-9. Member Without a Support Collapse Mechanism
		Figure 4-10. Effect of a Concrete Stripping Charge
	UNSUCCESSFUL BRIDGE DEMOLITIONS
		Figure 4-11. Cantilever Effect
		Figure 4-12. Causes of Jamming
	SIMPLY SUPPORTED BRIDGES AND CONTINUOUS BRIDGES
		Figure 4-13. Span Differences
		Figure 4-14. Categorization Chart for Simply Supported Bridges
		Figure 4-15. Typical Cross Sections of Steel-Beam Bridges
		Figure 4-16. Side Elevation of Steel-Truss Bridges
		Figure 4-17. Midspan, Cross-Sectional Views of Typical Concrete Bridges
		Figure 4-18. Normal Bowstring Bridge
		Figure 4-19. Bowstring-Reinforced Truss Bridge
		Figure 4-20. Measurements of Simply Supported Spans
		Figure 4-21. Line of Attack
		Figure 4-22. Location of an Angled Charge
		Figure 4-23. Continuous Bridges Categorization Chart
		Figure 4-24. Cantilever Bridges
		Figure 4-25. Cantilever and Suspended Span Bridges
		Figure 4-26. Steel-Beam Bridge Without a Short-Side Span
		Figure 4-27. Steel-Truss Bridge With a Short-Side Span
		Figure 4-28. Steel-Beam Bridge With a Short-Side Span
		Figure 4-29. Typical Portal Bridges
		Figure 4-30. Arch Bridges
		Figure 4-31. Masonry-Arch Bridge
		Figure 4-32. Measurements of Continuous Bridges
	MISCELLANEOUS BRIDGES
		Figure 4-33. Suspension Span Bridge
		Figure 4-34. Swing Span Truss Bridge
		Figure 4-35. Double-Leaf Bascule Bridge
		Figure 4-36. Single-Leaf Bascule Bridge
		Figure 4-37. Vertical Lift Bridge
		Figure 4-38. Floating Bridge
		Figure 4-39. Bailey Bridge Demolition
	ABUTMENTS
		Figure 4-40. Abutment Destruction (5 Feet Thick or Less)
		Figure 4-41. Abutment Destruction (Over 5 Feet Thick)
	INTERMEDIATE SUPPORTS
		Figure 4-42. Intermediate-Support Placement Charges
Chapter 5: Demolition Operations and Training
	SECTION I – DEMOLITION OPERATIONS
		DEMOLITION OBSTACLES
		BARRIERS AND DENIAL OPERATIONS
		DEMOLITION PLANNING
		DEMOLITION ORDERS
		PRELIMINARY DEMOLITIONS
		RESERVED DEMOLITIONS
		RECONNAISSANCE ORDERS
		RECONNAISSANCE RECORD
		OBSTACLE FOLDER
	SECTION II – DEMOLITION EFFECTS SIMULATOR DEVICES
		OVERVIEW
		PREREQUISITES
	SECTION III – CHARACTERISTICS AND ASSEMBLY INSTRUCTIONS
		SHEET EXPLOSIVE DEMOLITION EFFECTS SIMULATOR
			Figure 5-1. Sheet Explosive DES Assembly
			Table 5-1. BOM for a Sheet Explosive DES
		M112 (COMPOSITION C4) BLOCK DEMOLITION EFFECTS SIMULATOR
			Figure 5-2. M112 (Composition C4) Block DES
			Table 5-2. BOM for an M112 (Composition C4) Block DES
		1-POUND, TRINITROTOLUENE-BLOCK DEMOLITION EFFECTS SIMULATOR
			Figure 5-3. 1-Pound, TNT-Block DES
			Table 5-3. BOM for a 1-Pound TNT-Block DES
		M5A1 (DEMOLITION) BLOCK CHARGE EFFECTS SIMULATOR
			Figure 5-4. M5A1 (Demolition) Block DES
			Table 5-4. BOM for an M5A1 Demolition Block DES
		M183 DEMOLITION-SATCHEL CHARGE DEMOLITION EFFECTS SIMULATOR
			Figure 5-5. Filled M85 Carrying Case
			Figure 5-6. M183 Satchel Charge DES
			Table 5-5. BOM for an M183 Demolition-Satchel Charge DES
		M2A3 15-POUND, SHAPED CHARGE DEMOLITION EFFECTS SIMULATOR
			Figure 5-7. 15-Pound, Shaped Charge DES
			Table 5-6. BOM for an M2A3 15-Pound, Shaped Charge DES
		M3 40-POUND, SHAPED CHARGE DEMOLITION EFFECTS SIMULATOR
			Figure 5-8. 40-Pound, Shaped Charge DES
			Table 5-7. BOM for a 40-Pound, Shaped Charge DES
		40-POUND, CRATERING CHARGE DEMOLITION EFFECTS SIMULATOR
			Figure 5-9. 40-Pound, Cratering Charge DES
			Table 5-8. BOM for a 40-Pound, Cratering Charge DES
		BANGALORE TORPEDO DEMOLITION EFFECTS SIMULATOR
			Figure 5-10. Bangalore Torpedo DES
			Table 5-9. BOM for a Bangalore Torpedo DES
		M1 MILITARY DYNAMITE DEMOLITION EFFECTS SIMULATOR
			Figure 5-11. M1 Military Dynamite DES
			Table 5-10. BOM for an M1 Military Dynamite DES
	SECTION IV – PRIMING METHODS
		DEMOLITION EFFECTS SIMULATORS WITHOUT INTERNAL DETONATING CORD BOOSTERS
			Figure 5-12. Knots
			Figure 5-13. Priming a Sheet Explosive DES With Detonating Cord
			Figure 5-14. Priming a Sheet Explosive DES With MDI
			Figure 5-15. Priming an M112 DES With Detonating Cord
			Figure 5-16. Priming a TNT Block DES Using Detonating Cord
			Figure 5-17. Priming a TNT Block DES (With Adapter) Using an MDI
			Figure 5-18. Priming a TNT DES (Without Adapter) Using an MDI
			Figure 5-19. Priming an M1 Dynamite DES Using Detonating Cord
			Figure 5-20. End-Priming M1 Military Dynamite Using a DES
			Figure 5-21. Side-Priming M1 Military Dynamite DES
		DEMOLITION EFFECTS SIMULATORS WITH INTERNAL DETONATING CORD BOOSTERS
			Figure 5-22. Priming a TNT DES (With Booster) Using Detonating Cord
			Figure 5-23. Priming a TNT DES (With Booster) With an MDI
			Figure 5-24. Priming an M5A1 DES Using an MDI
			Figure 5-25. Priming an M183 DES Using Detonating Cord
			Figure 5-26. Priming an M183 DES Using an MDI
			Figure 5-27. Priming a 15-Pound, Shaped Charge DES Using Detonating Cord
			Figure 5-28. Priming a 15-Pound, Shaped Charge DES Using an MDI
			Figure 5-29. Priming a 40-Pound, Shaped Charge DES Using Detonating Cord
			Figure 5-30. Priming a 40-Pound, Shaped Charge DES Using an MDI
			Figure 5-31. Priming a 40-Pound, Cratering Charge DES Using Detonating Cord
			Figure 5-32. Priming a 40-Pound, Cratering Charge DES Using an MDI
			Figure 5-33. Priming a Bangalore Torpedo DES Using Detonating Cord
			Figure 5-34. Priming a Bangalore Torpedo DES Using an MDI
	SECTION V – SAFETY PROCEDURES AND RISK ASSESSMENT
		SAFETY GUIDELINES
		LEADER RESPONSIBILITIES
Chapter 6: Demolition Safety
	SECTION I – GENERAL SAFETY
		CONSIDERATIONS
		EXPLOSIVE MATERIALS
		BOREHOLES
		TOXICITY
		NATURAL PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
			Table 6-1. MSD for Blasting Near Radio Frequency Energy
			Table 6-2. MSD for Personnel in the Open (Near Bare Charges)
		UNDERWATER OPERATIONS
		SAFE DISTANCES
	SECTION II – MISFIRE PROCEDURES
		CHARGES FIXED TO TARGETS
		BANGALORE TORPEDO
		SLAM M4
		NONELECTRIC
		ELECTRIC
		DETONATING CORD
	SECTION III – TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE SAFETY
		TRANSPORTATION
		STORAGE SAFETY
	SECTION IV – MILITARY EXPLOSIVES DESTRUCTION
		CONCEPT
		SITE SELECTION
		METHODS
	SECTION V – ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
		MILITARY MUNITIONS RULE
		ENVIRONMENTAL RISK MANAGEMENT
Chapter 7: Explosive Urban Entry
	BREACHING EFFECTS AND HAZARDS
	SAFETY
	NET-EXPLOSIVE WEIGHT AND MINIMUM SAFE DISTANCES
		Table 7-1. NEW Formulas
		Table 7-2. K Factor Conversion
		Table 7-3. MSD for K Factor of 18 Representing 4.5 Pounds Per Square Inch
	DETONATING CORD LINEAR CHARGE
		Figure 7-1. Detonating Cord Linear Charge
		Figure 7-2. Up-and-Down Charge
	OVAL (SILHOUETTE) CHARGE
		Figure 7-3. Oval (Silhouette) Charge
		Table 7-4. Target Thickness
	CONCRETE CHARGE
	RUBBER-STRIP CHARGE (WINDOW CHARGE)
		Figure 7-4. Placement of a Rubber-Strip Charge (Doors)
		Figure 7-5. Rubber-Strip Charge Construction
		Figure 7-6. Placement of a Rubber-Strip Charge (Windows)
	WATER CHARGE
		Figure 7-7. Water Charge
		Figure 7-8. Placement of a Water Impulse Charge (Metal Door)
	C-CHARGE
		Figure 7-9. C-Charge Construction
		Figure 7-10. Placement of a C-Charge (Door)
	DOUGHNUT CHARGE
		Figure 7-11. Doughnut Charge
	ULI KNOT SLIDER CHARGE
		Figure 7-12. Uli Knot Slider Charge
	FENCE CHARGE
		Figure 7-13. Fence Charge
	RAPID WALL-BREACHING KIT
	INITIATION SYSTEM USING A MODERNIZED DEMOLITION INITIATOR
		Figure 7-14. Initiation System Using MDIs
	BREACHERS BRIEF
	HASTY BREACHERS BRIEF
Appendix A: Metric Conversion Chart
	Table A-1. Metric Conversion Chart
Appendix B: Metric Charge Calculations
	Table B-1. Standard U.S. Army Demolition Charges (Metric Equivalents)
	Table B-2. TNT Steel-Cutting Charges
	Table B-3. Material Factors for Breaching Charges
Appendix C: Demolition Charge Use
	Table C-1. AT Mine Explosives Content (By Nation)
	Table C-2. GP Aerial Bombs (Explosives Content)
Appendix D: Expedient Demolitions
	Figure D-1. Improvised Shaped Charge
	Figure D-2. Platter Charge
	Figure D-3. Grapeshot Charge
	Figure D-4. Detonating Cord Wick
	Figure D-5. Expedient Flame Fougasse
	Figure D-6. Gregory Knot
	Figure D-7. Scanman Knot
Appendix E: Power Requirements for Series Firing Circuits
	Table E-1. Resistance of Copper Wire
	Table E-2. Power Source Capabilities
Appendix F: Example Calculations
	Figure F-1. Timber-Cutting Charge Calculation (Internal)
	Figure F-2. Timber-Cutting Charge Calculation (External)
	Figure F-3. Steel-Cutting Charge Calculation
	Figure F-4. Hasty, Steel-Cutting Charge Calculation
	Figure F-5. Steel-Cutting Charge Calculation (Steel Plate)
	Figure F-6. Steel-Cutting Charge Calculation (I Beam)
	Figure F-7. Steel-Cutting Charge Calculation (Steel Bar)
	Figure F-8. Steel-Cutting Charge Calculation (High-Carbon Steel)
	Figure F-9. Breaching Charge Calculation (Reinforced Concrete Pier)
	Figure F-10. Counterforce Charge Calculation
	Figure F-11. Cratering Charge Calculation
	Figure F-12. Concrete Stripping Charge Calculation
	Figure F-13. Bottom-Attack Bridge Calculation
	Figure F-14. Top-Attack Bridge Calculation
	Figure F-15. Arch-Bridge Attack Calculation
Appendix G: Underwater Demolitions
	Figure G-1. Impalement Blasting Outside the Hull
	Figure G-2. Impalement Blasting Within the Hull
	Figure G-3. Freeing a Ship From a Rock Pinnacle
	Figure G-4. Trenching and Tunneling With Explosives Alongside a Ship
	Figure G-5. Channel Alteration
	Figure G-6. Sandbar Removal
	Figure G-7. DWFA Board
	Figure G-8. Typical Detonating Cord Preparation
Appendix H: Attacking Bridges With Demolitions
	Table H-1. Minimum ER Values For Bottom Attack (Percent)
	Table H-2. Minimum LC Values For Top Attack (Midspan)
	Table H-3. Minimum LC Values For Arch and Pinned-Footing Bridge Attacks
	Table H-4. Attack Methods on Simply Supported Bridges
	Table H-5. Attack Methods on Continuous Bridges
Appendix I: Instructions For Completing Demolitions-Related Reports
	Figure I-1. Sample DA Form 2203
Appendix J: Demolition Effects Simulator Materials
	Table J-1. DES Materials
Appendix K: Risk-Assessment Checklist
	Table K-1. Commander’s Risk Assessment for Live Demolitions
	Table K-2. Factors
	Table K-3. Severity of Training
Glossary
References
Index
Authentication
PIN
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 1

FM 3-34.214 (FM 5-250)


EXPLOSIVES AND DEMOLITIONS


July 2007

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http://www.train.army.mil

Page 199

Bridge Demolition

Cantilever and Suspended-Span Bridges
4-35. If a cantilever bridge incorporates a suspended span (Figure 4-25) that is at least 5 meters longer than
the enemy assault bridging capability, this section of the bridge should be attacked. This requires less
preparation. Because suspended spans are simply supported, the attack method described for simply
supported bridges should be used (Table H-4, pages H-4 through H-8).

Figure 4-25. Cantilever and Suspended Span Bridges

Beam or Truss Bridges
4-36. For beam or truss bridges (Figure 4-26, Figure 4-27, page 4-18, and Figure 4-28, page 4-18),
differentiate between those bridges with spans of similar lengths and those with short-side spans because
this affects the attack method. A short-side span is one that is less than three quarters of the length of the
next adjacent span.

Figure 4-26. Steel-Beam Bridge Without a Short-Side Span

11 July 2007 FM 3-34.214 4-17

Page 200

Chapter 4

Figure 4-27. Steel-Truss Bridge With a Short-Side Span

Figure 4-28. Steel-Beam Bridge With a Short-Side Span

Portal Bridges
4-37. For portal bridges (Figure 4-29), differentiate between those with fixed footings and those with
pinned footings because this affects the attack method. If the footing type cannot be determined, assume
that it has fixed footings. Portal bridges, as opposed to arch bridges, lack a smooth curve between the
bearing point of the span and the span itself.

Figure 4-29. Typical Portal Bridges

4-18 FM 3-34.214 11 July 2007

Page 397

FM 3-34.214
11 July 2007

By order of the Secretary of the Army:

GEORGE W. CASEY, JR.
General, United States Army

Chief of Staff

Official:

JOYCE E. MORROW
Administrative Assistant to the

Secretary of the Army
0717101

DISTRIBUTION:
Active Army, Army National Guard, and U.S. Army Reserve: To be distributed in accordance with the
initial distribution number (IDN) 110022, requirements for FM 3-34.214.

Page 398

PIN 084115-000

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