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TitleGiving and Receiving Performance Feedback
TagsPerformance Appraisal Perception Evaluation Self-Improvement Motivation
File Size654.6 KB
Total Pages168
Table of Contents
                            Contents
Introduction
The Annual Performance Review
Making Performance Feedback Meaningful
Feedback Models
Feedback Perspectives
Feedback Consequences
Levels of Performance Feedback
Self-Directed Feedback
Performance Feedback Planner
Organizational and Personal Goals
Performance Feedback: A Look Ahead
                        
Document Text Contents
Page 2

GIVING AND RECEIVING
PERFORMANCE FEEDBACK


Peter R. Garber














HRD Press, Inc. � Amherst � Massachusetts

Page 84

LEVELS OF PERFORMANCE FEEDBACK


75


Quantitative Feedback Example


Ratings: 1 = Poor 2 = Good 3 = Excellent
Rating Importance Value

Meets deadlines and
completes assignments on
time.



x



=




Shows initiative on the job.
Does more than required.


x


=




Has technical knowledge and
skills required for the job.


x


=




Communicates clearly both in
writing and speaking.


x


=




Is cooperative and displays
positive attitude.


x


=




Scoring:

Add the Ratings column:

Add the Value column:

Divide the Value column by
the Ratings column to
determine overall
performance rating:




Performance
Rating:




General Comments:

Page 85

GIVING AND RECEIVING PERFORMANCE FEEDBACK


76


Although there is some subjectiveness to how an individual’s scores
might have been arrived upon, the rest of the evaluation progress is in a
very formatted manner. A rating can be easily analyzed and broken down
into the person’s strengths and weaknesses that contributed to their final
score. A weighting system such as the one shown in the example takes into
account the various requirements of the different jobs that will be evaluated
using this form. Particular tasks given a high degree of importance might
be highlighted as being more significant on the person’s overall evaluation.
This format also offers the advantage of providing the evaluator with
all the performance criteria that is to be rated. This set format eliminates
the need for the evaluator to identify and describe the elements of the
person’s specific job that is to be rated. This pre-established criteria is
much less personal than one that specifically includes references to the job
that is being evaluated.
This approach does offer certain benefits and advantages over more
personalized formats. The most obvious is that these performance
evaluation forms are easier and less time consuming to complete. This can
be a very important factor for busy supervisors today who have many
people to evaluate.
In many ways, this set format might pose less of a threat to both the
supervisor and the person being evaluated. Because it is less personal, there
is not as great a potential threat to a person’s self-esteem. The focus of the
entire evaluation might be more on the “bottom line” numerical rating than
on any of the specific details of the evaluation. This format is typically
relatively brief in length and can be reviewed with the recipient in less time
than many of the approaches to be discussed.


Level IV. Formal Feedback System—
Personalized Communications
This format typically combines numerical or quantitative performance
measures and personalized feedback. The performance feedback form is

Page 167

GIVING AND RECEIVING PERFORMANCE FEEDBACK


158


What are some of the KA-BOOMers you hear in your workplace?

Page 168

PERFORMANCE FEEDBACK: A LOOK AHEAD


159


How can you help reduce the number of KA-BOOMers that exist at work
and give others performance feedback that can help them reach both their
personal goals, as well as the organization’s goals in the future?

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