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Titlejawahar kala kendra
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Page 1

LOCATION : Jawaharlal Marg, JAIPUR
Completion : 1991
TYPE : Arts and crafts center
Architect : Architect Charles Correa
PLOT AREA : 9.5 acres
BUILT-UP AREA : 8100 sq.m.
Introduction
Jawahar Kala Kendra also known as nine-square house of culture, Jawahar Kala Kendra is an
arts and crafts centre located in the city of Jaipur. the centre is important not because of the
nomenclature but its close association with the city of Jaipur itself. The centre was built in the
year 1986 and the construction completed in 1991. The centre was launched by the state
government to provide space to the cultural and spiritual values of India and display the rich
craft heritage. The centre is dedicated to the late prime minister of India Jawaharlal Nehru.


Loca%on
 
It
 is
 located
 in
 the
 prime
 loca%on
 of
 south
 Jaipur.
 The
 centre
 is
 situated
 on
 Jawaharlal
 marg
 
opposite
 to
 Rajasthan
 Commerce
 College.
 It
 is
 located
 on
 a
 parcel
 of
 land
 having
 an
 area
 
 of
 9.5
 
acres
 and
 the
 building
 is
 surrounded
 by
 lush
 green
 landscaped
 garden.
 On
 one
 side
 it
 has
 a
 
Shilp
 Gram
 made
 in
 a
 replica
 of
 cluster
 of
 village
 huts.
 The
 center
 was
 opened
 to
 public
 an
 April
 
1983.
 the
 built-­‐
 up
 is
 around
 8100
 sq.m.
 
 

 

Connectivity
Railway station – 7 kms
Airport – 6 kms

JAWAHAR
 KALA
 KENDRA

Page 4

ACTIVITIES
The centre has been made in eight blocks housing
• museums,
• theatres,
• library,
• arts display room,
• cafeteria,
• Hostel,studio
The centre is frequently occupied with artists and arts loving people. Many exhibitions
and performances by local artists are displayed at the centre. The annual festivals of
classical dance and music are held in the centre. The centre hosts many workshops of
dance and music.

Layout
Each of the nine planet is represented by a square, 30m x 30m, defined by red sandstone
walls, 8m high. The programme of the Arts Centre is disaggregated into nine separate
groupings, each corresponding to the myths of a particular planet; for instance the planet
Guru ( which symbolises Learning) houses the Liberary. The traditional symbol of each planet
is expressed in marble and stone inlay in the stone walls that surround it. The central square,
as specified in the ancient Vedic shastras, is a void: representing the Nothing – which is the
true Source of all Energy.

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