Download Notes Punjab University Lahore B.A English Explanation of Poems PDF

TitleNotes Punjab University Lahore B.A English Explanation of Poems
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LeisureLeisureLeisureLeisure
By


William Davies

Stanza No 1Stanza No 1Stanza No 1Stanza No 1::::
What is this life if full of care,What is this life if full of care,What is this life if full of care,What is this life if full of care,
We have no time to stand and stare?We have no time to stand and stare?We have no time to stand and stare?We have no time to stand and stare?
No time to stand beneath the boughsNo time to stand beneath the boughsNo time to stand beneath the boughsNo time to stand beneath the boughs
And stare as long as sheep or cows.And stare as long as sheep or cows.And stare as long as sheep or cows.And stare as long as sheep or cows.
MeaningsMeaningsMeaningsMeanings::::
Care---������� ،�
�, stare---��

�ر��،د��, beneath---ے���, boughs---ٹہ���ں .
ReferenceReferenceReferenceReference::::
These lines have been taken from “Leisure”“Leisure”“Leisure”“Leisure” written by ““““William DaviesWilliam DaviesWilliam DaviesWilliam Davies””””.
ContextContextContextContext::::
In this poem shows his sadness over the busy life of modern man. He says that people are
so much busy in their worldly affairs that they even have no time to enjoy life. They do not have
time to look around and enjoy beautiful objects of nature.

ExplanationExplanationExplanationExplanation::::
In these lines, the poet says that our life is useless if it is full of worldly worries and
cares. We are so much busy that we have no time to stand and look at the beauty around us. Even we
have no time to stand under a tree and look its beautiful boughs. He criticizes the modern man by
saying that the cows and sheep have time to watch the beauty of trees but unfortunately we have no
time to enjoy this beauty of nature. Actually in these lines the poet warns us on our rushed life and
advises us to spare some time to relax.

Stanza 2Stanza 2Stanza 2Stanza 2::::
No time to see, when woods we pass,No time to see, when woods we pass,No time to see, when woods we pass,No time to see, when woods we pass,
WhereWhereWhereWhere squirrels hide their nuts in grass.squirrels hide their nuts in grass.squirrels hide their nuts in grass.squirrels hide their nuts in grass.
No time to see, in broad daylight,No time to see, in broad daylight,No time to see, in broad daylight,No time to see, in broad daylight,
Streams full of stars, like skies at night.Streams full of stars, like skies at night.Streams full of stars, like skies at night.Streams full of stars, like skies at night.
MeaningsMeaningsMeaningsMeanings::::
Woods---���� ٹ��
�, squirrels----ہ���ں��, nuts---ہ���
ے وا! ��� ار�
� #$%.
Reference to the Context:Reference to the Context:Reference to the Context:Reference to the Context:
Same as above.

ExplanationExplanationExplanationExplanation::::

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In these lines, the poet shows his sadness on the busy life of modern man. He says

that we are in so much hurry that we even not have time to enjoy the ordinary beauties of nature.
While passing through woods we do not watch squirrels playing and hiding there nuts in grass. We
even not enjoy the beauty of running brooks and streams. When the light of sun reflects from the
water it looks like the sky full of stars in night. Here again he shows his sadness by saying that man
has no time to watch this charming scene. In short, in the whole stanza is full of writer’s woe over
business of modern man.

Stanza 3Stanza 3Stanza 3Stanza 3::::
No time to turn at BeaNo time to turn at BeaNo time to turn at BeaNo time to turn at Beauty’s glance,uty’s glance,uty’s glance,uty’s glance,
And watch her feet, how they can dance.And watch her feet, how they can dance.And watch her feet, how they can dance.And watch her feet, how they can dance.
No time to wait till her mouth can No time to wait till her mouth can No time to wait till her mouth can No time to wait till her mouth can
Enrich that smile her eye began.Enrich that smile her eye began.Enrich that smile her eye began.Enrich that smile her eye began.
A poor life if, full of care,A poor life if, full of care,A poor life if, full of care,A poor life if, full of care,
We have no time to stand and stare.We have no time to stand and stare.We have no time to stand and stare.We have no time to stand and stare.
MeaningsMeaningsMeaningsMeanings::::
Glance---�&�،ہ���, enrich--- ر*�()���ز
Reference to the Context:Reference to the Context:Reference to the Context:Reference to the Context:
Same as above.

ExplanationExplanationExplanationExplanation::::
In early lines of the poem, the poet talks about different beauties of nature that we miss
due to our rushed life. But in these lines, the poet refers to the human beauty. He says that apart from
other beauties of nature man also does not enjoy human beauty that is always seen singing and
dancing around him. Here he describes human beauty in the form of a young girl, who wants to
share her smile with us. She wants to show her different dancing gestures. But, man is so much busy
that he even not waits for so little time to see that smile that began from her eyes to reach her mouth.
In the ending lines of the poem, here again the poet shows his disgust over the business of man. He
says that it would be a poor life if it is full of worldly of cares and worries.

2222----Tartary Tartary Tartary Tartary
By


Walter De La Mare

Stanza 1Stanza 1Stanza 1Stanza 1::::
If I were Lord of Tartary.If I were Lord of Tartary.If I were Lord of Tartary.If I were Lord of Tartary.
Myself and me alone,Myself and me alone,Myself and me alone,Myself and me alone,

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causes problem for a moment not for whole life. She says to master in the art of losing lose

something everyday and it is not hard to master in the art of losing.

Stanza 3:Stanza 3:Stanza 3:Stanza 3:
Then practice losing farther, losing faster;Then practice losing farther, losing faster;Then practice losing farther, losing faster;Then practice losing farther, losing faster;
Places and names and where it was you went.Places and names and where it was you went.Places and names and where it was you went.Places and names and where it was you went.
To travel. None of these will bring disasterTo travel. None of these will bring disasterTo travel. None of these will bring disasterTo travel. None of these will bring disaster
Reference to the Context:Reference to the Context:Reference to the Context:Reference to the Context:

Same as above.

Explanation:Explanation:Explanation:Explanation:
In these lines, the poet suggests us the way to become expert in the field of losing. She says
that in order to become master in this field try to lose more and quickly. This will make you able to
bear the loss of anything. Sometimes, we forget the names of some persons or names of some places
we have visited. But, it is a fact that forgetting of these things does not bring any disaster in life.
Hence, the art of losing make us bear the loss of all these things with courage.

Stanza 4:Stanza 4:Stanza 4:Stanza 4:
I lost my mother’s watch. And look; my last, or I lost my mother’s watch. And look; my last, or I lost my mother’s watch. And look; my last, or I lost my mother’s watch. And look; my last, or
NextNextNextNext----totototo----lastlastlastlast, of three loved houses went., of three loved houses went., of three loved houses went., of three loved houses went.
The art of losing isn’t hard to masterThe art of losing isn’t hard to masterThe art of losing isn’t hard to masterThe art of losing isn’t hard to master
Reference to the Context:Reference to the Context:Reference to the Context:Reference to the Context:
Same as above.

Explanation:Explanation:Explanation:Explanation:
In these lines, with the help of some examples, the poet tries to tell us that it is not difficult to
be master in the art of losing. She tells us that once she lost her mother’s watch. Then, she had three
beautiful houses which were very dear to her. I lost them also. But the life went on and on. It did not
bring any kind of disaster in her life. Hence, if we try it is not hard to become expert in the field of
losing and this will make our life easy.

Stanza 5:Stanza 5:Stanza 5:Stanza 5:
I lost two cities, lovely ones. And, vaster,I lost two cities, lovely ones. And, vaster,I lost two cities, lovely ones. And, vaster,I lost two cities, lovely ones. And, vaster,
Some realms I owned, two rivers, a continent.Some realms I owned, two rivers, a continent.Some realms I owned, two rivers, a continent.Some realms I owned, two rivers, a continent.
I mI mI mI miss them but iiss them but iiss them but iiss them but it wasn’t a disaster.t wasn’t a disaster.t wasn’t a disaster.t wasn’t a disaster.
Reference to the Context:Reference to the Context:Reference to the Context:Reference to the Context:
Same as above.

ExExExExplanation:planation:planation:planation:
In these lines, with the help of some examples, the poet tries to tell us that it is not difficult to
be master in the art of losing. She says that even the loss of some big things does not bring any kind
of disaster in life. She gives the example of losing her two beautiful cities. Then she says that she
lost some things bigger than that. She lost a realm which was her. Then she lost two rivers and even
a continent. But, the loss of even these things did not bring any kind of disaster in her life. Life goes
on and on.

Stanza 6:Stanza 6:Stanza 6:Stanza 6:
Even losing (the joking voice, a gestureEven losing (the joking voice, a gestureEven losing (the joking voice, a gestureEven losing (the joking voice, a gesture

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I love) I shan’t have lied. It’s evident I love) I shan’t have lied. It’s evident I love) I shan’t have lied. It’s evident I love) I shan’t have lied. It’s evident
The art of losing’s not too hard to masterThe art of losing’s not too hard to masterThe art of losing’s not too hard to masterThe art of losing’s not too hard to master
Though it may look like (Write it) like disaster.Though it may look like (Write it) like disaster.Though it may look like (Write it) like disaster.Though it may look like (Write it) like disaster.
Meanings of difficult words:Meanings of difficult words:Meanings of difficult words:Meanings of difficult words:
Gesture--- )�5 *��ل �� �4ت )� ا`ہ�ر )��� ��V �( A5)�ت ��ہ�,
�ں .
Reference to the Context:Reference to the Context:Reference to the Context:Reference to the Context:
Same as above.

Explanation:Explanation:Explanation:Explanation:
In these lines, with the help of some examples, the poet tries to tell us that it is not difficult to
be master in the art of losing. She addresses to her friend and she says that she likes her joking voice
and his gesture. But she is not going to tell a lie. She will even bear his loss also. Actually, with this
example she tries to tell us that though it is hard to bear the loss of some near and dear one. But it is
also a fact that we have to bear this disaster also. It is not hard to master in the art of losing.

9999---- The Solitary ReaperThe Solitary ReaperThe Solitary ReaperThe Solitary Reaper
By


William Wordsworth

Stanza 1:Stanza 1:Stanza 1:Stanza 1:
Behold her, single in the field,Behold her, single in the field,Behold her, single in the field,Behold her, single in the field,
Yon solitary Highland lass;Yon solitary Highland lass;Yon solitary Highland lass;Yon solitary Highland lass;
Reaping and singiReaping and singiReaping and singiReaping and singing by herself;ng by herself;ng by herself;ng by herself;
Stop here, or gently pass.Stop here, or gently pass.Stop here, or gently pass.Stop here, or gently pass.
Meanings of difficult words:Meanings of difficult words:Meanings of difficult words:Meanings of difficult words:
Behold---�
��T )�ٹ��---��b, Reap =�د8 = ہ---Lass ,�ہ�ڑHighland---8 ,وہ،ا%�aف---Yon ,د�
Reference:Reference:Reference:Reference:
These lines have been taken from the poem “The Solitary“The Solitary“The Solitary“The Solitary Reaper”Reaper”Reaper”Reaper” written by “William“William“William“William
Wordsworth”.Wordsworth”.Wordsworth”.Wordsworth”.
Context:Context:Context:Context:
Words worth is called the poet of nature. He finds a joy in every object of nature. In this
poem, he describes a very pleasant incident of seeing a beautiful girl, while his visit to Scotland. It
gave him unlimited joy. Actually, the girl of this poem is a part of nature and so she becomes a
source of joy for him.

Explanation:Explanation:Explanation:Explanation:

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have started shaking. The dream of the poet continues and he hears the rolling sound of apples

stored in the cellar, as their huge loads arrive.

Stanza 4:Stanza 4:Stanza 4:Stanza 4:
For IFor IFor IFor I have had too muchhave had too muchhave had too muchhave had too much
Of appleOf appleOf appleOf apple----picking; I am overtiredpicking; I am overtiredpicking; I am overtiredpicking; I am overtired
Of the great harvest I myself desired.Of the great harvest I myself desired.Of the great harvest I myself desired.Of the great harvest I myself desired.
There were ten thousand thousand fruit to touch,There were ten thousand thousand fruit to touch,There were ten thousand thousand fruit to touch,There were ten thousand thousand fruit to touch,
Cherish Cherish Cherish Cherish in hand, left down and not let fallin hand, left down and not let fallin hand, left down and not let fallin hand, left down and not let fall
For all For all For all For all
That struck the earth That struck the earth That struck the earth That struck the earth
No matter if not bruised or spiked with stubble,No matter if not bruised or spiked with stubble,No matter if not bruised or spiked with stubble,No matter if not bruised or spiked with stubble,
Went surely to the ciderWent surely to the ciderWent surely to the ciderWent surely to the cider----apple heapapple heapapple heapapple heap
As of no worth.As of no worth.As of no worth.As of no worth.
Meanings of difficult words:Meanings of difficult words:Meanings of difficult words:Meanings of difficult words:
Cherish---oے )� *�اہ��( �M�V ز��دہ, bruised--- �ا)�+ ہ , spiked---���( ڑے
��دے ---stubble ,ٹ
��س �
�/�ے )� ���cider---7 ,)ے )��رے
Reference to the Context:Reference to the Context:Reference to the Context:Reference to the Context:
Same as above.

Explanation:Explanation:Explanation:Explanation:
In these lines, the poet explains that he has tired from apple picking. Still, there are thousands
of apples on the trees and he wants to pluck all these apples with his own hands. He knows that all
those apples that fell down and hit the ground, will surely become useless for storage. These spoiled
apples will then be crushed for juice in the machine.

Stanza 5:Stanza 5:Stanza 5:Stanza 5:
One can seeOne can seeOne can seeOne can see what will trouble what will trouble what will trouble what will trouble
This sleep of mine, whatever sleep This sleep of mine, whatever sleep This sleep of mine, whatever sleep This sleep of mine, whatever sleep it it it it is,is,is,is,
Were he no gone,Were he no gone,Were he no gone,Were he no gone,
The woodchuck could say whether it’s like hisThe woodchuck could say whether it’s like hisThe woodchuck could say whether it’s like hisThe woodchuck could say whether it’s like his
Longs sleep, as I describeLongs sleep, as I describeLongs sleep, as I describeLongs sleep, as I describe----its coming on its coming on its coming on its coming on
Of just some human sleep.Of just some human sleep.Of just some human sleep.Of just some human sleep.
Meanings of difficult words:Meanings of difficult words:Meanings of difficult words:Meanings of difficult words:
Woodchuck---ر���� Fہ�8 )� :�ح )� ا���.
Reference to the Context:Reference to the Context:Reference to the Context:Reference to the Context:
Same as above.

Explanation:Explanation:Explanation:Explanation:
These are ending lines of the poem. The poet says that who wants to sleep is well aware what
will disturb his sleep. Apart forms that, he wants to know what kind of sleep he is having. He says
woodchuck could tell it easily about it. But that animal has gone. Now poet does not say surely
whether his sleep will be like that of woodchuck or just a normal sleep for a few hours. He cannot
also say whether it will be ordinary human sleep or the sleep of death. Here, in these lines the poet

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